Coronavirus good news thread

Liamo

Well-known member
New research from University College, London says none of the SARS-CoV-2 mutations documented so far (including the infamous D614G variation) actually increase transmissibility.
“Fortunately, we found that none of these mutations are making COVID-19 spread more rapidly, but we need to remain vigilant and continue monitoring new mutations, particularly as vaccines get rolled out.”

SARS-CoV-2 mutations don't increase transmissibility
 

Liamo

Well-known member
Rapid, One-Step Mobile Test for COVID-19 Developed
In a new study published in the scientific journal Cell, the team from Gladstone, UC Berkeley, and UCSF has outlined the technology for a CRISPR-based test for COVID-19 that uses a smartphone camera to provide accurate results in under 30 minutes. [...]
Not only can their new diagnostic test generate a positive or negative result, it also measures the viral load (or the concentration of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19) in a given sample.
 

Liamo

Well-known member

FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
A study in Edinburgh University has discovered 5 genes that are associated with severe covid, and so can select drugs to trial to target the actions of these specific genes.


“Our results immediately highlight which drugs should be at the top of the list for clinical testing. We can only test a few drugs at a time, so making the right choices will save thousands of lives.”
 

FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
Invermectin, a cheap,safe anti-parasitic drug that has been available for decades has been producing good results in multiple trials for a while now. I’m surprised it isn’t more widely discussed as a treatment option. Perhaps it will be a ‘dexamethasone’ type breakthrough soon ?

He added that “what is truly remarkable — this was a gift to us — ivermectin has high activity against COVID-19.”

“All studies showed positive benefits — the majority showed a decrease in mortality, decreases in hospitalization,” Kory said.

In light of the positive data on ivermectin in COVID-19, the researchers called on national and global health authorities — including the NIH, WHO and the CDC — to examine the data.”


 

Liamo

Well-known member
Invermectin, a cheap,safe anti-parasitic drug that has been available for decades has been producing good results in multiple trials for a while now. I’m surprised it isn’t more widely discussed as a treatment option. Perhaps it will be a ‘dexamethasone’ type breakthrough soon ?

He added that “what is truly remarkable — this was a gift to us — ivermectin has high activity against COVID-19.”

“All studies showed positive benefits — the majority showed a decrease in mortality, decreases in hospitalization,” Kory said.

In light of the positive data on ivermectin in COVID-19, the researchers called on national and global health authorities — including the NIH, WHO and the CDC — to examine the data.”


Dr John Campbell did a review of these findings in a recent video. He seems to be somewhat sceptical of their conclusions which I find a little puzzling, given his usual mantra of following the evidence and his normal tendency to put faith in research from reputable scientists and institutions using evidence-based medicine.

I've read their full paper and it seems to be based on a lot of well-conducted scientific studies. Admittedly, as Dr Campbell points out, only half of them have been peer-reviewed so far but by the same token that means that fully 50% of them have been - and there are a large number of them, all pointing to the same conclusion.
 

FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
Dr John Campbell did a review of these findings in a recent video. He seems to be somewhat sceptical of their conclusions which I find a little puzzling, given his usual mantra of following the evidence and his normal tendency to put faith in research from reputable scientists and institutions using evidence-based medicine.

I've read their full paper and it seems to be based on a lot of well-conducted scientific studies. Admittedly, as Dr Campbell points out, only half of them have been peer-reviewed so far but by the same token that means that fully 50% of them have been - and there are a large number of them, all pointing to the same conclusion.

I saw that video and I couldn’t quite figure out his viewpoint, to be honest. I thought if anything, he was somewhat irritated that it hasn’t yet been properly looked at, by study, in the U.K.
It certainly seems like some credible doctors and scientists have been willing to put their neck out there and push for this drug to be used.
Time will tell I guess. It’s a little frustrating that it would appear to have potentially huge benefits but isn’t really being talked about.

As a note of interest, I can’t claim credit for that video but I did message him to say it might be worthy of his time to look into it, and then the next day he posted that video. Probably just coincidence but I’m not going to lie, I did feel quite excited when he posted it the very next day.
 

FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
The Geordies have been looking into reinfection rates among their healthcare workers, and have found good immunity levels *so far*, which bodes very well.
They had data for 11103 staff since the first wave, 1038 of whom were confirmed to have SARS-COV 2 by PCR test and antibody test during the first wave, which is a fairly decent sample size, (especially given that these good people are working at the high end of the risk of infection spectrum.)
Of those 1038, nil have been reinfected in the second wave but there were 290 infections in their colleagues (who were not infected during the first wave)
So 6-7 month immunity as a minimum looks good.
Obviously this was only a study of working age people, but nevertheless it bodes well.
Well done to the Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS trust for being proactive in looking at this as the months progressed!

Journal Pre-proof for anybody interested -


 

bear66

Well-known member
The Geordies have been looking into reinfection rates among their healthcare workers, and have found good immunity levels *so far*, which bodes very well.
They had data for 11103 staff since the first wave, 1038 of whom were confirmed to have SARS-COV 2 by PCR test and antibody test during the first wave, which is a fairly decent sample size, (especially given that these good people are working at the high end of the risk of infection spectrum.)
Of those 1038, nil have been reinfected in the second wave but there were 290 infections in their colleagues (who were not infected during the first wave)
So 6-7 month immunity as a minimum looks good.
Obviously this was only a study of working age people, but nevertheless it bodes well.
Well done to the Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS trust for being proactive in looking at this as the months progressed!

Journal Pre-proof for anybody interested -


NERVTAG investigated 915 cases of the new variant in the south east through November/early December. 4 of those cases were probable reinfections. Assuming 10% of people had had the disease previously, that would suggest 5% possible reinfection rate. That is still a high protection rate comparable with a vaccine.
 

FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
Not long to wait for next vaccine trial results now. Next few weeks hopefully 🤞
This is a single dose vaccine, and is getting sold at cost, so would be excellent news if it has good efficacy.

 
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