No plans for 24-hour Covid vaccination centres, says No 10

Caesium137

Well-known member
Like I say, that would only work if you actually have the staff and vaccine supply to enable 24 hour working.

Also, whilst NHS staff and care workers are in the current priority groups, I don’t believe that police, fire or other key workers are. Unless you have a surplus in supply of vaccine, for every person you vaccinate outside of the priority groups, you will be delaying vaccination for someone who is within them.

Obviously I meant to stay with the current vaccinating schedule which I believe is health workers and the elderly/vulnerable?

So out of those, health workers on nights could be done then, leaving more daytime availability for the vulnerable groups?

Maybe, obviously there will be logistical issues in all of this.
 

Statto1

Well-known member
Much as I would love to lambast this government even more, I actually think there is little merit in 24 hour vaccination centres. Certainly at the current point in time.

They are probably already working at the limit of their available resources in terms of trained staff and supply of vaccine.

If you then look at the priority groups for vaccination, I can’t imagine very many 80+ year olds would fancy popping out for a jab at 3am. Even if they did, there’s no public transport available at that time.

Perhaps an idea for a few months’ time when they have more trained staff, vaccine supply and are looking to vaccinate the public at large.
I agree with this 100%, we won't have enough vaccine, staff and the most at risk groups preferring out of hours rather than normal hours would be extremely low I expect. Also, they would not want to be seen to have "run out" of vaccine as we would outstrip supply very quickly. This would actually be a good thing, using it as fast as possible, but it would not get spun that way by the press (and then the idiots would start kicking off, and probably overrun the place).

Also, the problem with 24 hour operation is it means two shifts, and normally this doesn't mean splitting the staff in half across two shifts, it normally means needing an extra 20% staff too.

In summer when we're onto the <60 year olds and probably have more established supply, then yeah, do it, if we can get the staff. But after we get through the most "at risk" groups it would be more beneficial to change the testing centres to drive in/ walk in vaccination centres, based on appointment. Drive up in a car with a passenger, wind the passenger window down, get jabbed, drive the passenger off. If they have a problem, drop them back off.

To be honest if they had a waiver online and you could fill in your address, I would let them post me it and inject it myself, and I expect millions would do the same. There's enough competent people to do online training, take a mini test and inject themselves, the benefit easily outweighs the risk.
 

asredastheycome

Well-known member
I was thinking today. A lot of companies have medics and medical staff on their payrolls. It would make sense that they could possible help out by vaccinating members of their workforce.

Another thing I noticed today. At the new mass vaccination centre in Newcastle there was a lot of what looked like ambulance workers/paramedics in the queue. You would have thought that they would have been jabbed at the hospital rather than have to go into Newcastle and waste time.

I see Newcastle had 7 teams going out to homes and they have vaccinated 50 care homes this week. Well done to them, good organisation.
 

kuepper

Well-known member
I don't feel comfortable about how you can more or less overnight train 37000 volunteers to inject ppl, accident waiting to happen surely
 

Muttley

Well-known member
The injection is given "intra muscular" like a flu jab, you just need to hit a large muscle mass, I reckon that training to give such a jab for First Aiders and others would be feasible. Pharmacists already give Flu jabs so they could do it. From an odd memory I think that Vets are allowed to administer injections to many species (including Homo Sapiens) so they could do it...
 

Statto1

Well-known member
I don't feel comfortable about how you can more or less overnight train 37000 volunteers to inject ppl, accident waiting to happen surely
It's a needle, not a heart bypass.

I would be up for self administering, so trusting some guy that's had an hours training and done 100 before me is zero concern.

In the forces they train you to inject yourself with atropine (not a needle, like how you imagine), and only spend about 1 minute training you how to do it. Then you get sent to the gulf and never even get to see what a real one looks like before going, or never get to train with a real one, I never anyway :oops:

Fair enough some would be too scared to do it or apprehensive, but I think those that are up for it could make a massive difference to getting this rolled out quickly. There would be a risk of course, but if everyone is shooting up within a mile of a hospital and under supervision of their partner, then there's not a lot that could go wrong, compared to the benefit it could provide.
 

the_holgate_roof

Well-known member
So the nearest mass vaccination centre for the North East is the Life Centre in Newcastle, so are people from Boro getting invited there or will it still be the GPs??? My mother I think is in group 3 so still awaiting an invite.
 

Blf

Well-known member
I would go anytime day or night to get the vaccine.
There are lots of people who would be willing to help with vaccinating people who can't due to the rules.
I retired fully in November and my registration as a mental health nurse ended. I used to give IM injections to people on a daily basis at their home and spent many years running clinics with up to 40 people a day attending for IM injections.
With the campaign for people to help out growing I thought I would volunteer to do the specific training for the vaccine and help.
NHS site says for retired nurses we should go to the St John's site to volunteer. St John's site say no plans to recruit for vaccinators.
On another message board I go on several retired nurses said they had the same responses and had rang up to volunteer only to get the same response.
 

Caesium137

Well-known member
It's a needle, not a heart bypass.

I would be up for self administering, so trusting some guy that's had an hours training and done 100 before me is zero concern.

In the forces they train you to inject yourself with atropine (not a needle, like how you imagine), and only spend about 1 minute training you how to do it. Then you get sent to the gulf and never even get to see what a real one looks like before going, or never get to train with a real one, I never anyway :oops:

Fair enough some would be too scared to do it or apprehensive, but I think those that are up for it could make a massive difference to getting this rolled out quickly. There would be a risk of course, but if everyone is shooting up within a mile of a hospital and under supervision of their partner, then there's not a lot that could go wrong, compared to the benefit it could provide.

Good old combo pens and NAPS drills in dress cat 3 romeo, many a happy hour once a year!
 

Caesium137

Well-known member
I would go anytime day or night to get the vaccine.
There are lots of people who would be willing to help with vaccinating people who can't due to the rules.
I retired fully in November and my registration as a mental health nurse ended. I used to give IM injections to people on a daily basis at their home and spent many years running clinics with up to 40 people a day attending for IM injections.
With the campaign for people to help out growing I thought I would volunteer to do the specific training for the vaccine and help.
NHS site says for retired nurses we should go to the St John's site to volunteer. St John's site say no plans to recruit for vaccinators.
On another message board I go on several retired nurses said they had the same responses and had rang up to volunteer only to get the same response.

IM?

Oh, and good on you!
 

Muttley

Well-known member
So the nearest mass vaccination centre for the North East is the Life Centre in Newcastle
On the map I saw there were the initial mass vaccination centres labelled but also a load of red dots on the map unlabelled. Three of the dots were roughly Darlington, Stockton and Middlesbrough, so I would expect that where I got my Flu jab (the football stadium in Darlo) would be used. Were there similar arrangement in Stockton and Boro? Just in terms of people movement you can't have the whole population of Teesside schlepping up to "The Toon" for their jabs, wouldn't work would it?
 

Centralscrutinizer

Well-known member
On the map I saw there were the initial mass vaccination centres labelled but also a load of red dots on the map unlabelled. Three of the dots were roughly Darlington, Stockton and Middlesbrough, so I would expect that where I got my Flu jab (the football stadium in Darlo) would be used. Were there similar arrangement in Stockton and Boro? Just in terms of people movement you can't have the whole population of Teesside schlepping up to "The Toon" for their jabs, wouldn't work would it?
The only person I know who's had the vaccine got it at the hospital in Redcar.
 

Laughing

Well-known member
My dad has his locally in Middlesbrough I believe last week. My sister took him so it may have been outside boro, but I don't think so.
 
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