Shamima Begum refused return to UK

bear66

Well-known member
Why would they not? Citizenship is a human rights issue no?
Because none of the lawyers who have attempted to get access to the Syrian refugee camp have been allowed in by the camp authorities. So can you name one that will be allowed in?
 

Liamo

Well-known member
And yet a film crew and some fashion advisers are?
Not sure about "fashion advisers" but yes, film crews have access to these camps (and have had for a long time) while her lawyers have not been allowed in for some time. Which might seem like a strange paradox but is true nevertheless.
 

Norman_Conquest

Well-known member
Before he is beheaded,[21] Henning appears on camera, handcuffed behind his back and in a kneeling position, next to a knife-wielding masked man (Jihadi John, of the ISIL cell known as The Beatles). Henning speaks, referencing the British Parliament's decision to participate in a coalition of countries, such as the United States, that have banded together to bomb the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
 

Muttley

Well-known member
And the fact she qualified for Bangladeshi citizenship at the time we removed her citizenship yet Bangladesh, a Muslim country, don’t want her either speaks volumes.

anyway, as I said above, “if she comes etc...,”
Why should the Bangladeshis look after our problem? She is not a Bangladeshi citizen, has never set foot there. Our Government, unsurprisingly, have flouted international law and convention and it is repugnant populism that has driven and excused it.
 

El Guapo

Well-known member
Why should the Bangladeshis look after our problem? She is not a Bangladeshi citizen, has never set foot there. Our Government, unsurprisingly, have flouted international law and convention and it is repugnant populism that has driven and excused it.
As I said, if she comes back etc
 

Blf

Well-known member
Because none of the lawyers who have attempted to get access to the Syrian refugee camp have been allowed in by the camp authorities. So can you name one that will be allowed in?
At least one lawyer has seen her. When she was interviewed last week she said she couldn't answer some of the questions as she has had legal advice telling her not to.
 

FatCat

Well-known member
Because none of the lawyers who have attempted to get access to the Syrian refugee camp have been allowed in by the camp authorities. So can you name one that will be allowed in?
So how do they speak with her then ?
 

FatCat

Well-known member
Why should the Bangladeshis look after our problem? She is not a Bangladeshi citizen, has never set foot there. Our Government, unsurprisingly, have flouted international law and convention and it is repugnant populism that has driven and excused it.
Without opening a can of worms - she is a Bangladeshi citizen through her mother. This is their own laws so if anything the Bangladeshis are running roughshod over their own laws by attempting to say the law of their land doesn’t apply to her.

read up on it.
Section 5 of the Citizenship Act 1951states that, a person born outside Bangladesh ‘shall be a citizen of Bangladesh by descent’ if either of his or her parents is a citizen of Bangladesh at the time of his or her birth.
 
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Liamo

Well-known member
Section 5 of the Citizenship Act 1951states that, a person born outside Bangladesh ‘shall be a citizen of Bangladesh by descent’ if either of his or her parents is a citizen of Bangladesh at the time of his or her birth
That link doesn't work for me (404 error). However according to the following article, while she might have had the right to claim Bangladeshi citizenship before, she no longer does, as her opportunity to do so has expired.
Bangladesh's nationality laws say that any individual who has parents with Bangladeshi citizenship is automatically deemed entitled to citizenship.

The law, however, states that this entitlement expires if the individual has not claimed it before the age of 21.

Bangladesh will not allow Shamima Begum into country

It's similar to the situation some people of Irish descent are in - they would be eligible to apply for Irish citizenship through their grandparents but if they've never claimed it, they are not actually Irish citizens.
 
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jam69

Well-known member
The question I ask myself is did she show any remorse whatsoever in her interviews - No. the second question is has she manipulated her media coverage within her camp while claiming inability to get legal help in her camp at the same time thus showing a duplicitous side - yes. My conclusion: she hasn’t changed one jot from her non repentant interviews given initially and I wouldn’t trust her to lie straight in bed. Sorry, in this case I have little sympathy.

it she comes back I’d expect her to see out her days in prison, as I would my own child if they’d done what she’s done. I’d still love them but ultimately You make your choice and face the consequences.
Maybe she showed no remorse as because in doing so could result in her being killed?
There's around 20 murders a month in those camps
 

FatCat

Well-known member
That link doesn't work for me (404 error). However according to the following article, while she might have had the right to claim Bangladeshi citizenship before, she no longer does, as her opportunity to do so has expired.


Bangladesh will not allow Shamima Begum into country

It's similar to the situation some people of Irish descent are in - they would be eligible to apply for Irish citizenship through their grandparents but if they've never claimed it, they are not actually Irish citizens.
My take and how the court ruled is it’s not something she has to apply for, she is a Bangladeshi citizen by birth based on her mother.
 

FatCat

Well-known member
That link doesn't work for me (404 error). However according to the following article, while she might have had the right to claim Bangladeshi citizenship before, she no longer does, as her opportunity to do so has expired.


Bangladesh will not allow Shamima Begum into country

It's similar to the situation some people of Irish descent are in - they would be eligible to apply for Irish citizenship through their grandparents but if they've never claimed it, they are not actually Irish citizens.
This is a good read on the matter

 

JackG

Well-known member
This is a good read on the matter

Reading the BTL comments on that article raises an interesting point regarding de jure vs de facto statehood. One of the comments suggests that if Bangladesh rejects her statehood, even in contravention of its own statehood laws, then she doesn't hold statehood within the meaning of the 1954 UNCHR Convention, to which the UK is a signatory. I found this argument quite compelling, but I'm no legal scholar.
 

FatCat

Well-known member
Reading the BTL comments on that article raises an interesting point regarding de jure vs de facto statehood. One of the comments suggests that if Bangladesh rejects her statehood, even in contravention of its own statehood laws, then she doesn't hold statehood within the meaning of the 1954 UNCHR Convention, to which the UK is a signatory. I found this argument quite compelling, but I'm no legal scholar.
It’s certainly got the lawyers in a pickle. I guess it boils down to interpretation. You can probably argue both cases and back that up with various legal acts.

ultiantely I think Bangladesh didn’t want the problem and hence warned she could be hanged if returned there.

At some point I am sure we will see her back on these shores which in balance is probably the right thing.
 

bear66

Well-known member
It’s certainly got the lawyers in a pickle. I guess it boils down to interpretation. You can probably argue both cases and back that up with various legal acts.

ultiantely I think Bangladesh didn’t want the problem and hence warned she could be hanged if returned there.

At some point I am sure we will see her back on these shores which in balance is probably the right thing.
It is a pickle. I struggle to see how the UK judiciary can make a judgement on complex Bangladeshi law in order to make s judgement on whether the home office have acted legally.
 

Laughing

Well-known member
It is a pickle. I struggle to see how the UK judiciary can make a judgement on complex Bangladeshi law in order to make s judgement on whether the home office have acted legally.
They couldn't even make a ruling they were happy with bear. Their ruling invites an appeal and I don't mean that figuratively the supreme Court have said they will re hear the case in the event begum can gain entry to the country
 
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