Selling stuff to EU countries

The_Lizards_Jumpers

Well-known member
Yeah we got a letter from Parcel Force this morning, someone has sent us something from Switzerland (we don't know what or who, as we have loads of mates who live there, so it could be from one of about 30 people) and they want us to pay £31.25 in import fees and handling charges to even find what it is.

It could be worth a quid for all we know, until we open it.

An update for those of you who've probably been on the edge of your seats waiting to hear what it was....

It was a bottle of wine, send as a Christmas gift to Mrs Jumpers, from a management consultancy she works closely with. It was declared to customs as 50 CHF in value, which is about £40, and so that bottle of wine has cost around 70 quid all in. The best bit is I hate red wine, and she can't drink it as she's pregnant :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

Cooper671

Well-known member
An update for those of you who've probably been on the edge of your seats waiting to hear what it was....

It was a bottle of wine, send as a Christmas gift to Mrs Jumpers, from a management consultancy she works closely with. It was declared to customs as 50 CHF in value, which is about £40, and so that bottle of wine has cost around 70 quid all. The best bit is I hate red wine, and she can't drink it as she's pregnant :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

I'll have it ;)
 

pierrequiroule

Well-known member
In simple terms, as I’m too tired, I expected all our MPs on all sides to be grown ups and to put party politics, internal party grievances, self interest etc aside in order to do as I said in pulling together experts etc and working together to obtain a deal as I described whereby both EU and UKcould grow together but as separate entities. I did not expect the pathetic tearing of themselves apart by either party, nor did I expect the EU to be so against a nation state deciding to leave, they are, after all, purveyors and purported of democracy are they not? So I’m disappointed in that.

Labour, and the other major parties asked from early on in the process to form a cross-party group to oversee the transition - it was rejected out of hand by May. Subsequent attempts were also rebuffed.

I don't recognise your view of the EU's attitude to the UK. My view is that they started the negotiations with a helpful attitude but May was so intent on looking tough and driving a hard bargain that she quickly soured relations. For instance, something that affected me - in the first weeks of the negotiations the EU offered to retain the status quo with regard to the status of EU citizens living and working in the UK and british citizens living and working in the EU. This would have saved nearly 4 years of stress and uncertainty for many of the EU and british expats, some of whom returned home fearing they would lose their right to stay. It was rejected out of hand with no explanation. If the EU began playing hardball as the negotiations were going nowhere (the british didn't seem to know what they wanted which made negotiation impossible) then the british government brought it on themselves.
 

El Guapo

Well-known member
Labour, and the other major parties asked from early on in the process to form a cross-party group to oversee the transition - it was rejected out of hand by May. Subsequent attempts were also rebuffed.

I don't recognise your view of the EU's attitude to the UK. My view is that they started the negotiations with a helpful attitude but May was so intent on looking tough and driving a hard bargain that she quickly soured relations. For instance, something that affected me - in the first weeks of the negotiations the EU offered to retain the status quo with regard to the status of EU citizens living and working in the UK and british citizens living and working in the EU. This would have saved nearly 4 years of stress and uncertainty for many of the EU and british expats, some of whom returned home fearing they would lose their right to stay. It was rejected out of hand with no explanation. If the EU began playing hardball as the negotiations were going nowhere (the british didn't seem to know what they wanted which made negotiation impossible) then the british government brought it on themselves.
Which backs up all my points entirely about the people on the UK side. Perhaps I am being harsh on the EU, I guess anyone would get peed off having to try and negotiate with our lot.
 

Scrote

Active member
Which backs up all my points entirely about the people on the UK side. Perhaps I am being harsh on the EU, I guess anyone would get peed off having to try and negotiate with our lot.
I think the main issue is that there was never an intention from the leave camp to negotiate in good faith.

The reason No Deal was still a possibility so late in the day is because the ERG and others were still actively pushing for it.

Teresa May's red lines made it impossible to have any sensible structure to the deal and then Priti Patel's insistence on no freedom of movement at all meant we couldn't negotiate around the other freedoms - including trade.

I empathise with your current feelings of betrayal but I do think they need to be laser-focused on those that did the betraying - and (in my opinion) it wasn't the EU.
 

El Guapo

Well-known member
I think the main issue is that there was never an intention from the leave camp to negotiate in good faith.

The reason No Deal was still a possibility so late in the day is because the ERG and others were still actively pushing for it.

Teresa May's red lines made it impossible to have any sensible structure to the deal and then Priti Patel's insistence on no freedom of movement at all meant we couldn't negotiate around the other freedoms - including trade.

I empathise with your current feelings of betrayal but I do think they need to be laser-focused on those that did the betraying - and (in my opinion) it wasn't the EU.
Yeah, you are probably right and as I said, I was maybe being harsh on EU.

I’ll know in future not to naively trust that those standing for election have the same morals as I do or necessarily have the nations interests at heart.
 

Corcaigh_the_Cat

Well-known member
I voted Brexit. I don’t agree with where I believe EU is heading, which is an EU superstate, as I have previously discussed many times (I am not xenophobic but I think it unworkable for a number of reasons) and I stand by that. However, I also believed we would have a Parliament ‘big enough’ to put aside party politics and that would set aside differences in the ‘greater good’ to assemble the best possible team not only from Parliament but experts in the relevant fields (law, business and business negotiations etc) to negotiate an orderly and mutually beneficial withdrawal agreement with the EU, to enable both the UK and EU to grow side by side but independent of each other. The more time has passed, and the more squabbling, self interest, corruption and incompetence I see, the more I can’t help but feel let down and that I have been (I have allowed myself to be) duped / deceived. I am disappointed in myself.

I can only apologise.

FWIW, I voted labour at the last 2 elections and lib-dem prior to that.

edited for typo only.

I was undecided until the last minute. It was the views of the electorate here that persuaded me to vote to stay in Europe. We're incapable of seeing through the charlatans running the show for the last decade.
 

WoodallServices

Well-known member
Irrespective of which side of the divide you’re on the UK was respected worldwide for its diplomacy skills and the Tories have absolutely trashed that in the blink of an eye!!
To be fair to them I think they have been slowly dismantling it for over a decade.
 

Corcaigh_the_Cat

Well-known member
Irrespective of which side of the divide you’re on the UK was respected worldwide for its diplomacy skills and the Tories have absolutely trashed that in the blink of an eye!!
To be fair to them I think they have been slowly dismantling it for over a decade.

They're still dismantling but the Covid crisis may delay the NHS carve up by a year or two.
 

Ex Footy Legs

Well-known member
I was undecided until the last minute. It was the views of the electorate here that persuaded me to vote to stay in Europe. We're incapable of seeing through the charlatans running the show for the last decade.
Just a reminder of the current early consequences of the great British public’s decision manipulated by Boris and his friends 👍
Lots more heart breaking stories to come but here’s the first 5

What’s the real time benefits again whilst people lose their jobs ?
 

Ex Footy Legs

Well-known member
What about the Broccoli??
Cooper : ‘way out west’ answered for me so your childish comments have been addressed however, once again I was highlighting something that’s now widespread as the country sinks into disarray with either red tape and regulations
Your politicians promised you something different from this 👌
 

SalfordBoro

Member
I voted Brexit. I don’t agree with where I believe EU is heading, which is an EU superstate, as I have previously discussed many times (I am not xenophobic but I think it unworkable for a number of reasons) and I stand by that. However, I also believed we would have a Parliament ‘big enough’ to put aside party politics and that would set aside differences in the ‘greater good’ to assemble the best possible team not only from Parliament but experts in the relevant fields (law, business and business negotiations etc) to negotiate an orderly and mutually beneficial withdrawal agreement with the EU, to enable both the UK and EU to grow side by side but independent of each other. The more time has passed, and the more squabbling, self interest, corruption and incompetence I see, the more I can’t help but feel let down and that I have been (I have allowed myself to be) duped / deceived. I am disappointed in myself.

I can only apologise.

FWIW, I voted labour at the last 2 elections and lib-dem prior to that.

edited for typo only.
I admire your honesty El Guapo - you voted for what you believed in and how you perceived the EU was going in terms of direction. Not on the basis of the vast majority of others. Basically what was written on the side of a bus or with the xenophobic views of Farage et al.

For me, I voted remain, on the basis that we are far too entrenched within the EU, too many laws and agreements to rescind in the short space of time it would take to change them. It's been a mess from the start and I despise the tory party and had one other view on this, they do not give a toss about anyone at all other then their bank accounts and how they make can a living out of this, not how others will be affected.
 

Ex Footy Legs

Well-known member
I voted Brexit. I don’t agree with where I believe EU is heading, which is an EU superstate, as I have previously discussed many times (I am not xenophobic but I think it unworkable for a number of reasons) and I stand by that. However, I also believed we would have a Parliament ‘big enough’ to put aside party politics and that would set aside differences in the ‘greater good’ to assemble the best possible team not only from Parliament but experts in the relevant fields (law, business and business negotiations etc) to negotiate an orderly and mutually beneficial withdrawal agreement with the EU, to enable both the UK and EU to grow side by side but independent of each other. The more time has passed, and the more squabbling, self interest, corruption and incompetence I see, the more I can’t help but feel let down and that I have been (I have allowed myself to be) duped / deceived. I am disappointed in myself.

I can only apologise.

FWIW, I voted labour at the last 2 elections and lib-dem prior to that.

edited for typo only.
El Guapo - appreciate your honesty mate. Thank you. I have a few people who voted tory in the latest election for the first time ever are severely regretting it now. Honesty 👍 Nice one.
 
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